MEAT FIGHT: Brisket, pulled pork and smoked bologna. Rhett Brinkley

A barbecue residency will continue in East Little Rock’s The Rail Yard at 1212 E. Sixth St. Eddie Greenwood, operator of the Smoked Out Eats barbecue food trailer, has set up shop in the food truck beer garden, taking the place of recently departed Count Porkula. Greenwood has been at The Rail Yard throughout December and January. The Rail Yard hosted an official grand opening for the food truck on Dec. 31.

For the moment, Smoked Out Eats is a one-man operation run by Greenwood (his daughter helps him on the weekends), an Arkansas native and third generation barbecue man. Greenwood is operating out of a trailer and smoking his meat and sides on a custom-built T-Pit smoker from Johnson Custom BBQ Smokers out of Ennis, Texas.

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Rhett Brinkley
OPEN TILL SOLD OUT: Eddie Greenwood of Smoked Out Eats.

Greenwood said he’s unsure if he’s going to move into the building or just operate out of his trailer in the courtyard. He said this has been a dream of his for a long time, and the barbecue tradition in his family goes back to his grandparents on both sides. His great-grandfather raised hogs. Before he decided to pursue his barbecue career, he was a recording engineer and toured with the music festival Ozzfest, Brittany Spears, Beck and The Flaming Lips.

“I had a big music background, but barbecue was always something in the family … it’s kind of been a dream just flaming up.”

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Greenwood’s been at it for the last year setting up in Morrilton and Benton. He said that finding a permanent residence was important because of the specifications of his trailer, which he said is 13,500 pounds. His smoker resides in the trailer.

“I actually had to have my smoker craned in,” he explained. “I’ve always had an offset smoker till I built this one. It’s a T-Pit. With a T-Pit it’s a 500 gallon on top and the bottom is a 150 to 200 gallon pit underneath. I have the shafts built to where the smoke seeps through kind of like a bull in a horn.”

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On a brisk January afternoon The Arkansas Times barbecue research team visited the Rail Yard to check out Greenwood’s food and it did not disappoint. Between the three of us we got a little bit of everything: a brisket plate with beans and potato salad; The Meat Fight sandwich with smoked brisket, pulled pork, bologna, “og bbq sauce” and fresh cut jalapenos, as well as the Meat Fight plate with chopped brisket, pulled pork and a thick slice of smoked bologna.

BRISKET: with beans, potato salad and lunch hour beer.

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The brisket was slightly fatty in the trim but showed great bark development and practically fell apart to the touch — a tell-tale sign that it had been smoked for a very long time. The Meat Fight trio was a mixture of chopped brisket and pulled pork smothered with a Greenwood’s signature sauce.

Rhett Brinkley

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The Meat Fight sandwich packed brisket, pulled pork and a thick smoked bologna slice in a buttery, griddled bun. It was a glorious gut bomb.

Rhett Brinkley
MEAT FIGHT: Brisket, pulled pork and smoked bologna.

The standout of the meal, however, was the Razorback Egg — a proprietary barbecue egg-shaped quenelle consisting of a cheese-filled jalapeno that’s enveloped in ground beef, all wrapped up in bacon. Yes, it’s as delicious as it sounds. We forgot to take a photo until several bites had been taken. If there’s better beer-drinking food in town, we haven’t had it.

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Eat Arkansas
RAZORBACK EGGS

Also, the piping hot jalapeno cheese smoked sausage we tried on a previous visit exudes impossible amounts of spicy cheese with each bite.

One thing to note at Smoked Out Eats: Most of the sides spend some time in the smoker. This does wonderful things to the mac n cheese, which is some of the best in town, as well as the barbecue beans, which are on the sweet side and full of bacon. Greenwood also offers non-traditional smoked Brussels sprouts as a side (they are surprisingly good). While the meat and sides are great at Smoked Out Eats, we’d be remiss to not mention the sauce:

“My sauce is 113 years old, it was my grandmother’s recipe and my rubs have been passed down to my dad and to me,” Greenwood said.

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With a recipe that old, you already know it’s good.

“We just focus on old school barbecue. There’s no cutting corners … 15 hours low and slow, and I put everything I got into it.”

Rhett Brinkley contributed reporting.